In our view, CUSP is going to be to New York City, what Stanford was to Silicon Valley - becoming the engine for Urban Informatics Innovation as it defines the "Science of Cities."

And its roster of partners is very impressive - big household names that can bring to bear tremendous resources, vastly accelerating this process.

We feel that part of the Gov 2.0 proposition is to get people away from thinking of "Government as a Vending Machine". And by actively engaging specialized communities like Developers, Civic Hackers, Students and Researchers using the DataWell as a source of information but also a target of Innovation.

But what about "regular citizens?"  They too can play a part, just by using the NYCDataWell Launcher app, regular citizens can also contribute.  How?

When we imagined the Launcher app, we also thought that the City, and CUSP in particular can use it as a "Pocket Lab."  After all, current mobile devices are bristling with sensors, and perhaps, the local Maker community (we're looking at you ITP and AdaFruit) can even create a whole slew of external instrumentation packages that citizens can deploy not only on their current smartphones, but also on their old ones.

The Launcher App will have the ability to run these CUSP experiments in the background.

Imagine CUSP publishing research packages that citizens can sign up for:

  • ambient noise measurement
  • walking pace for each neighborhood
  • hyperlocalized commute times, that they can use to fine-tune public transportation resource allocation
  • and with a weather package, maybe old smartphones can be deployed as micro-weather stations indoors and outdoors
  • the possibilities are just limitless!

And why would citizens sign up for these experiments?  They can then see the data, and how they compare with the population.  It will even have the side benefit of "behaviorally nudging" them to modify their behavior for the better.